WHAT WE BELIEVE

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The attitudes and philosophy we bring to the table are key to the overall satisfaction of our clients, and are reflected within the following beliefs-

The client is always the most important voice within our process. We have no desire to create architecture that is primarily reflective of our egos; rather each project should be directly reflective of the clients program, budget, and aspirations. We also believe that the more involved the client is in the design process, the more likely the end result will be consistent with what their goals and not simply an expression of the architects belief system.

We embrace the idea that the truest and most comprehensive definition of sustainability is achieved by creating buildings that are “built to last”.  In our eyes, a building that can’t stand the test of time, whether that be construction quality or by simply remaining outside of design trends and fads can’t be considered sustainable, no matter how many “green” materials and systems are incorporated. We bias towards materials and finishes that have the potential to age and develop a patina.  We encourage clients to consider the idea that their buildings be conceived and constructed to last 200 years- while we can’t anticipate how the use of a structure might evolve and change, or what technologies will be developed to enhance efficiencies, we believe that if built with quality and design integrity, a building will truly be sustainable to its’ core.

We are great believers in learning from the past and from what already exists.  Rather than resulting in stasis, this allows us to maintain a forward momentum that doesn’t require starting from scratch with every project, and allows us to learn from our own past mistakes and those of others. This doesn’t mean that our designs are exclusively traditional, however we are never apologetic about traditionally based designs, and believe that modern design must look to the past as well as existing context and culture for inspiration.

Buildings should be designed and built for human beings. This sounds self-evident and overly simplistic, but we are continually perplexed how often our basic human needs are ignored in the design of many buildings, whether that is on emotional, inspirational, or simply functional levels. When we prepare site plans we think simultaneously about what the emotional aspects of the entry sequence might be, as well as how groceries might make their way from a car to the kitchen. When we draw floor plans, we draw furniture into plans at the earliest stages of design to ensure that the space feels comfortable and can function as intended; for instance we consider how a kitchen might work both for the preparation of a dinner party, and how it might work when a mid-week dinner for two is made. When we select materials and finishes, we try to anticipate how they might “live” and develop a patina, and how they feel at a human level of involvement.

This certainly doesn’t translate that we believe design shouldn’t be inspirational or transformational, nor exclusively traditional – quite the contrary. Rather, we believe that inspiration should come intuitively and not as an extroverted, force-fed expression of architectural ego. Buildings should be respectful of the larger world- of the context, of the environment, and they should stand the test of time, or they run the real risk of becoming just another part of our throw away society.

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HOW WE WORK

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